Management of dementia in primary care

BMJ Learning

British Medical Journal

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This course includes :

Scorm 01:0:0 hours 0 Downloadable resources Full lifetime access Certificate of Completion In Arabic & English Created at: 2022-05-25 10:51:58 Updated at: 2022-12-04 04:39:12 This scorm course might not include video lectures
USD 26

This course includes :

01:0:0 hours On-demand videos 0 Downloadable resources Full lifetime access Certificate of Completion In Arabic & English Created at: 2022-05-25 10:51:58 Updated at: 2022-12-04 04:39:12

You Will Learn

  • Timely diagnosis is important for most people with dementia to empower them to make their own decisions, plan the best possible care, and optimize clinical management
  • Treating pain, underlying medical conditions, and vascular risk factors is important for all patients with dementia
  • Specific drug treatments are recommended for Alzheimer’s disease, dementia associated with Parkinson’s disease, and dementia with Lewy bodies
  • In many patients behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia can be prevented without resorting to antipsychotic drugs Although antipsychotics are sometimes useful they should be offered only to patients at risk of harming themselves or others, or those experiencing agitation, hallucinations, or delusions that are causing them severe distress Antipsychotic medications should be avoided in patients with dementia. If they are indicated, their use should be reviewed regularly and for the shortest duration possible If a patient with dementia is already taking an antipsychotic medication, this should be stopped unless there is a clear ongoing indication and benefit
  • Although antipsychotics are sometimes useful they should be offered only to patients at risk of harming themselves or others, or those experiencing agitation, hallucinations, or delusions that are causing them severe distress
  • Antipsychotic medications should be avoided in patients with dementia. If they are indicated, their use should be reviewed regularly and for the shortest duration possible
  • If a patient with dementia is already taking an antipsychotic medication, this should be stopped unless there is a clear ongoing indication and benefit
  • It is important to identify and manage the needs of carers as well as those of patients

Description


This module covers the management of dementia and, in particular, the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms

Accreditations


Management of dementia in primary care

This scorm course might not include video lectures
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